Faculty of Education

Faculty of Education
Faculty of Education

Teachers as Change Leaders: The Faculty of Education’s 50th Anniversary Conference

Date: Saturday, October 20th 2018
Time: 12:00 pm – 4:30 pm
Location: University Club
Price: $30.00*
*includes lunch and light afternoon refreshments

50 current students will receive FREE conference registration to celebrate 50 years of teaching excellence.

Alumni, Teachers and Community: Online registration closes Wednesday, October 17th at noon. Tickets available in person at the door before event start.

Conference Schedule

Time Description
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm Lunch provided
1:00 pm - 1:05 pm Welcome and Introduction by Dean Rebecca Luce-Kapler
1:05 pm - 2:00 pm Dr. Dennis Sumara Keynote: Teachers as Change Leaders
2:00 pm - 2:50 pm Panel 1: Teachers as Change Leaders: What does this mean by the decades?
2:50 pm - 3:00 pm Dennis Sumara – response to panel
3:00 pm - 3:15 pm Light refreshments provided
3:15 pm - 4:15 pm Panel 2: Looking to the future
4:15 pm - 4:25 pm Dennis Sumara – response to panel
4:25 pm - 4:30 pm Closing remarks – Dean Rebecca Luce-Kapler

Download a PDF of the Conference Schedule


Panel 1: Teachers as Change Leaders: What does this mean by the decades?

Eleanor Newman on Education in the 1970s

In 1968, Living and Learning, The Report of the Provincial Committee on Aims and Objectives of Education in the Schools of Ontario (Hall – Dennis Report) was published. Its reasoned perspectives on children as learners, teachers as professionals, and the schools, systems and communities that support education proposed dramatic shifts in all aspects of the endeavour. Those beginning their career in the 1970s found inspiration for thinking differently about learning, teaching, and the profession. It now seemed possible for teachers to be change leaders.

About Eleanor
Over the years Eleanor has been a teacher, administrator, superintendent and director for boards across Ontario. She has worked with the Literacy and Numeracy Secretariat and is currently Executive Director, EOSDN.

Eleanor Newman on Education in the 1970s

Stephen Elliott on Education in the 1980s

Teachers routinely struggle to operationalize and optimize the demands of educational reform. This part of the presentation will explore teacher activity that both continued to help soften some of the challenges resulting from shifting education practice in the 60’s and 70’s while at the same time taking advantage of the freedoms offered by the same developments.

About Stephen
Stephen Elliott worked as a teacher in Gananoque, as a visual arts professor, and coordinator of the Artist in Community Education program before becoming Dean of the Queen’s Faculty of Education from 2010-2015.

Stephen Elliott on Education in the 1980s

Rosalie Griffith on Education in the 1990s

Teachers as change leaders marked the 90s in a way that had never been seen before, and this historic decade left a lasting impact on education in Ontario. Change leadership, as personal and political, will be explored as we review education in the 1990s and one Queen's teacher's experiences.

About Rosalie
Before becoming a Vice-Principal at A. Y. Jackson Secondary School and Northview Heights Secondary School in Toronto, Rosalie was an executive member of AHEN (African Heritage Educators' Network) and ONABSE (Ontario Alliance of Black School Educators). She taught in elementary schools, secondary schools, has been an associate teacher, an international teacher, and a seconded instructor at OISE.

Rosalie Griffith on Education in the 1990s

John Senisi on Education in the 2000s

The 2000s were a battleground for competing ideologies that irreversibly changed Western society. During this time teaching practice was defined by experimentation, adaptation, and the politicization of education. A newly expanded worldview increased awareness of the "other" and began to shed light on common practices that were fundamentally racist, elitist, or gender-biased.

About John
John is an artist, teacher, and community activist teaching Visual Arts and Photography at St. Jean de Brebeuf Catholic High School in Vaughan. In 2017 he received the Prime Minister’s Award for Teaching Excellence.

John Senisi on Education in the 2000s

Hannah Ramsay on Education in the 2010s

Graduates from my decade have found new and exciting ways to use their role as teachers to promote change in their communities. From advocating for mental health awareness and support, to creating productive dialogue about sexual and gender diversity, to traveling abroad to work with at-risk youth overseas, my classmates have already demonstrated the immense impact that teachers can have in fostering positive social change. As I begin my teaching career, I am inspired by my colleagues and the opportunity that exists to act as a catalyst for change in my school and community.

About Hannah
After completing her B.Ed. in 2017, Hannah began an M.Sc. at Queen’s in Physical, Inorganic Chemistry. She also works at a tutor and student advisor.

Hannah Ramsay on Education in the 2010s

Panel 2: Looking to the Future

Lee Airton on Gender and education

Gender scholars in the social sciences recognize that gender is far more complex than a mere M or F descriptor might suggest. Rather, gender is a complex, evolving and negotiated phenomenon in which everyone participates, reading and making meaning of each other’s ways of doing and being in the world. The addition of ‘gender expression’ and ‘gender identity’ protections to human rights legislation across Canada means that educational institutions must now act from a more complex and now legally-binding account of what gender means for our everyday practices. In this talk, Dr. Airton outlines some implications for teacher education.

About Lee
Lee is an Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Education. Lee’s teaching, research, and advocacy work focus on enabling individuals and institutions to welcome gender and sexual diversity.

Lee Airton on Gender and education

Karine Bertrand on Indigenous education

In a time when words such as “reconciliation” “cultural appropriation” and “colonialism” take on new meanings, especially for the younger generations of non-Indigenous students who are confronted with their status and history, the classroom can become a safe space in which these topics can be discussed and understood. To this avail, indigenous methodologies become an important tool that teaches the students about new ways of learning and understanding the world, for example by looking at research as being a powerful medicine (Research is Ceremony, S. Wilson, 2008) and as a way to decolonize academia and work with and for the communities (Decolonizing Methodologies, L. Tuhiwai-Smith, 2008). This presentation wishes to address how the integration and explanation of indigenous methodologies, as well as a teaching philosophy based on concrete projects and interventions by indigenous Elders can help both Indigenous and non-Indigenous students to implement the recommendations of the TRC (Truth and Reconciliation Commission) report and provoke social changes.

About Karine
Karine researches film studies, communications, and indigenous studies at Queen’s. She is currently working on Indigenous women’s cinema in the Americas, creating an online database of Indigenous women filmmakers’ works.

Karine Bertrand on Indigenous education

Alana Butler on At-risk youth and student success

Uncovering the myths and realities about at-risk children and their families in the Ontario context. How can we help them to succeed?

About Alana
Alana is an Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Education. Her current research agenda focuses on at-risk children and their families in elementary and secondary school settings.

Alana Butler on At-risk youth and student success

Jane Chin on International education

In light of the 50th celebration of Queen’s we will take stock of the exceptional leadership in the world of international education that Queen’s has developed over many years. Jane’s talk will highlight the ways that teachers are change leaders both in terms of the international school and development work related to education. The talk will be framed within a broader discussion about the evolving nature of international education.

About Jane
Jane is an Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Education. She teaches in the international concentration and English curriculum at the Faculty, has taught at international schools, and is currently involved in the 1 Million Teachers Project.

Jane Chin on International education

Anita Jack Davies on Diversity and equity

In this critical reflection, Anita Jack-Davies reflects on the movement towards inclusivity in Canada's teaching profession, even as we struggle as a nation to make calls from Canada's Truth and Reconciliation (TRC) meaningful in our work as educators. Dr. Jack-Davies reflects on what it means to teach and work in the field diversity management with educators, even as she struggles with belonging to the Canadian nation as a Black Canadian settler of Trinidadian descent. Using McKittrick's (2004) concept of Blackness in/and Canada as a "surprise", she contemplates the impact of increasing diversity in Canadian classrooms for how teachers are taught, and for how they, in turn, will education the next generation of students.

About Anita
Anita is Education and Awareness Facilitator at Ryerson University and an adjunct professor in the Department of Geography and Planning at Queen’s.

Anita Jack Davies on Diversity and equity

Claire Ahn on Digitalization and technology

The emergence of digital technologies has resulted in reading environments that are increasingly multimodal, giving rise to new and hybrid genres. This in turn, has an impact on the ways in which people communicate and understand information, which can greatly affect personal and social lives. Given such perspectives, this talk will present ways in which teachers can implement digital media to continue to support students’ learning and develop necessary skills for students to navigate a digitally complex world.

About Claire
Claire Ahn is an Assistant Professor of Multiliteracies at the Faculty of Education. She is interested in how visual information is mediated across different platforms. Claire has worked with educators of all grades and teacher-librarians in an effort to provide resources and lesson plan ideas around various topics of visual literacy and deceptive media.

Claire Ahn on Digitalization and technology